Sherbrooke history events from 1972

Sherbrooke history events beginning 1792

In 2011, Sherbrooke’s population was around 154 601 people. This population can be divided into three linguistic groups: 2 020 are English speaking only, 85 820 are French speaking only, 63 810 are able to speak in both French and English and 795 speak neither of the two official languages. Population has fluctuated by 4.9% between 2006 and 2011. Its density at this time is 437,4 people per square kilometer.

Loyalist families like the Ruiters were originally from the Palatinate in Germany. In the early years of the 18th century, several thousand German Protestants had left the “Palatinate” area along the Rhine River and took refuge in England, to escape the poverty of their homeland, which had been ravaged by European wars, and because of alleged religious persecution. Many “Palatines” subsequently were sent by the British Government to Ireland and then to America, where most settled in the colony of New York. During the American Revolution, their descendants tended to support the Crown. Henry Ruiter, for example, served as a Loyalist officer, and subsequently became a Justice of the Peace in Quebec. John Ruiter became an officer for the administration of oaths and Jacob Ruiter established a sawmill near Cowansville.

William Gray’s hanging occurred on December 10th, 1880 at Winter Prison. This journeyman, an intermittent worker, had been convicted of Thomas Mulligan’s murder.

The first settlers of European origin in Sherbrooke and in Ascot township are Loyalists. Having remained loyal to the British crown during the American Revolution, these refugees were partly resettled in the Eastern Townships.

The French Canadian begin to settle in Sherbrooke after the establishment of textile mills beginning in the 1850’s. The arrival of the railroad at the same time also stimulates population growth in Sherbrooke.

The British American Land Compagny stimulated settlement in the region. The colonisation company, established in Lennoxville and then in Sherbrooke, opened roads and facilitated the arrival of Scottish and Irish immigrants. Between 1835 and 1838, several hundred British subjects began a new life in the Eastern Townships.

The settlement of the French in the Eastern Townships was made possible by the establishment of the Association des Townships, by Father Bernard O’Reilley in 1848. Antoine Racine, bishop of Sherbrooke, will play an important role to promote the settlement of French Canadians. He founded the Sherbrooke Colonisation Society in 1881 and was its first president. He was also active in efforts designed to repatriate Franco-Americans living in New England.

During the 19th century, the increasing economy activities and the increasing number of countryside populations in the urban centers and the manufacturing towns only amplify the movement of anarchy and destabilizes the social and moral order. This was particularly the case for the city of Sherbrooke, which despite its small population, could not escape the disorder caused by the working classes, the unfortunate classes, the unemployed classes, the people who fight against the heads os state and the people who refuse to obey to the laws and the obligations. In addition, we are witnessing the illegal sale of alcohol along the construction sites, as well as fights and shoplifting. With the implementation of the prison Winter between 1865 and 1867, the penitentiary participated strongly into decreasing disorder, rehabilitation discipline and implementation of better laws in the city of Sherbrooke.

In 1792, a group of Loyalists led by Gilbert Hyatt are granted Ascot township. They will have to wait until 1801 to obtain confirmation of this grant.

In 1819, there are roughly 53 people living in Sherbrooke. Six years later, there are 180, and approximately 400 inhabitants by 1831. The population is young, as is typical in pioneer regions. In 1831, there are 153 children less than 14 years of age, making up 37% of the population.

The Jewish community of Sherbrooke appeared in the 1800s, but disappeared around 1980. Coming from Ukraine, the first family to settle was that of Reuben Hart in 1863. Continuing its expansion, the Jewish community reached 265 inhabitants, out of 23,660 inhabitants. After two waves of migration, the community declined and celebrated its last religious service in 1983.

From 1815 to 1850, British settlers came to the Eastern Townships in significant numbers. The British American Land Company (BALC) plays a significant role in attracting British citizens to the region. In the early 1830s, the BALC purchased 250,000 acres in the counties of Shefford, Sherbrooke and Stanstead, as well as 600,000 acres of unsurveyed land. The BALC launched a promotional campaign in 1835 that led potential settlers to believe that the climate of the region and the quality of the soil were favourable.

After the Second World War, a new wave of European immigrants arrives in the Eastern Townships. In the early fifties, a large number of French and Germans arrive in the region. From 1950 to 1960, Italian immigrants, Belgian, Polish, Austrian, Romanian and citizens of Eastern Europe come to Sherbrooke. The “Bien-être des Immingrants”, known today as the “Service d’aide aux Néo-Canadiens”, is founded in 1954.

Between 1844 and 1852, the population of the village of Sherbrooke triples, increasing from 600 to nearly 1900 inhabitants. The number of houses increased from 100 in 1846 to 167 in 1852.

The Paton factory having reached its goals, Andrew Paton hoped to increase the production of tweed (wool fabric) and cashmere. He received support from the municipal authorities and built two new buildings. The following year, the company has over 450 employees. Several families surrounding areas will be attracted by city life offered by a salaried job. Paton increases the jobs often open to all. Many working families, often French-Canadian, will move on the board Marquette.

The construction of Sherbooke’s Carrefour de l’Estrie began in 1972 and opened officially on October 8th, 1973. From the start, this large shopping center included several major shops and large chain department stores, such as Eaton’s (The Bay since 2000), as well as a Steinberg food store (now a Super C). In 1985, the shopping center expanded with the addition of a food court and a two-floor Zellers. Although it has changed over the years, the Carrefour de l’Estrie remains an important commercial hub not only for Sherbrooke, but for all of the Eastern Townships.

Built in 1836, the Magog House served alcoholic beverages to customers which lodged on the premises. At the beginning, it was mainly a stagecoach relay. In 1902, the establishment became the Magog Hotel. Today, the Bar le Magog occupies part of the building.

New active for 28 years, Chez Charlie opened at the corner of King Street West and Jacques-Cartier Street before it moved to its Camirand Street location on March 3, 1987. Chez Charlie sets itself apart by being one of the few establishments open 24 hours year round. In 28 years, the restaurant closed for only one day which was at the turn of the millennium.

Loyalist families like the Ruiters were originally from the Palatinate in Germany. In the early years of the 18th century, several thousand German Protestants had left the “Palatinate” area along the Rhine River and took refuge in England, to escape the poverty of their homeland, which had been ravaged by European wars, and because of alleged religious persecution. Many “Palatines” subsequently were sent by the British Government to Ireland and then to America, where most settled in the colony of New York. During the American Revolution, their descendants tended to support the Crown. Henry Ruiter, for example, served as a Loyalist officer, and subsequently became a Justice of the Peace in Quebec. John Ruiter became an officer for the administration of oaths and Jacob Ruiter established a sawmill near Cowansville.

The previous year we had a big house built four-storey red brick. This building marks the landscape of Sherbrooke. We had also met several businessmen with different specialties to structure a textile company. Dominant head of this project is Andrew Paton (1833-1892), a Scotsman who emigrated to Canada in 1855. At the opening on 1 June 1867, the new Sherbrooke company employs over 150 people, a record for the small city. Paton will be for the next 50 years the largest employer in the city of Sherbrooke.

Andrew Paton personally managed his factory in Sherbrooke until his death. At the time, the Paton was the largest wollen manufacture in Canada. Andrew Paton was also active in municipal politics, serving two terms as a city councilor (1876-1880 and 1889-1891).

Andrew Paton seizes the opportunity to increase and diversify production with new products such as worsted cloth and wool threads. Paton is the most important industry of the city and the pride of its citizens. Stimulated by the project, the city of Sherbrooke provides additional land to the project, a tax exemption for 25 years, and a subsidy of $ 25,000.

The factory Paton increased the number of workers. More than 750 employees worked in four different buildings. These textile workers accomplished various tasks such as spinning, prepare the wool manufacture fabrics by hand or machine, carding, weaving, repairing looms and dyeing.

After several altercations of the public order related to alcohol abuse, Sherbrooke decided in the 1860s to regulate the availability of alcoholic beverages by introducing a licensing system. In 1873, these licenses cost $ 55 each and were to be given to a maximum of 11 hotels. In fact, 16 such institutions obtained this privilege.

The King brothers are the first to sell alcohol legally in Sherbrooke. Their inn is located on a natural headland known as King hills.

The owners of Orford township (Jonathan Ball) ând of Ascot township (Gilbert Hyatt), establish a partnership to build a dam at the mouth of the Magog River. Their mills, which use the hydraulic power from the dam, will be the focal point for the new hamlet which will become Sherbrooke.

To provide light by electricity to homes and businesses in Sherbrooke, especially Wellington and King streets, the Sherbrooke Gas & Water (represented by A.J. Corriveau) purchased the electricity distribution rights which belonged yet to the Royal Electric Montreal for $ 6,000. The construction of the hydroelectric Frontenac on the Magog River was announced to produced electricity and the first test of the electrical system happened on April 23, 1888.

On 18 September 1852, the Longueuil – Sherbrooke rail line was inaugurated with with great pomp and ceremony. Businessmen and politicians of all stripes had worked for many years to break Sherbrooke from isolation. Their objective was to link their town to emerging commercial networks in Canada and in New England. The company would then work to connect Sherbrooke with the town of Island Pond in Vermont. With a freight train every two days, Sherbrooke enters the modern industrial world.

The Sherbrooke Cotton Factory was a four storey building with a bellfry erected on the north side of the Magog River. The factory was owned by the first limited liability manufacturing company incorporated under Canadian law. The first samples of grey calico were produced in the fall of 1845 and were sold on the local market. The corporation was sold in 1847 and was eventually taken over by Adam Lomas. The factory was destroyed in a fire in April 1854.

Adam Lomas rents the British American Land Company (BALC) woollen workshop on the south side of the Magog River to begin production of wool and flannel cloth. In June 1843, the Sherbrooke Woollen Factory begins production. The Belvedere Street workshop is rebuilt and production resumes in 1852. From then on mecanised, this manufacture reflects the beginnings of industrialisation in Sherbrooke.

The Canadian Rand Drill Company was founded in 1890 by the shareholders of the Jenkes Machine Company. The two sons of that company’s owner, S.W. Jencks and J.M. Jencks, are part of this group. The Jenkes Machine Company had been in Sherbrooke since 1850, and made machinery for sawmills and woollen mills. The shareholders partnered with an American company, the Rand Drill, to open a subsidiary in Sherbrooke. Construction began on the buildings destined to house the Canadian Rand Drill Company in 1892. The project benefited from important incentives from the city, which gave a $25,000 to the company as well as a tax exemption for 20 years.

The Andrews carding mill and its adjacent fulling mill are built by Elvin Andrews, a Vermonter, on one acre of land located on the north side of the Magog River. The owner of the south side (Gilert Hyatt), accepts not to build any mill of the same type for the next fifteen years. The carding mill is sold to the Parker brothers in 1812.

Charles Goodhue, a merchant, builds a three-storey wooden structure to house a weaving workshop for wool, a flour mill and a saw mill. Production begins in 1828, but the workshop will change hands several times before being acquired by the British American Land Company.

Electric lighting was presented for the first time in the city of Sherbrooke in June of 1880. The first demonstration was by the Forepaugh Circus, which used this new technology (produced by a 50 hp steam dynamoelectric machine) to light the show while impressing the spectators.

Le Petit Parisien is located in the city center of Sherbrooke, offering a typical decor of Paris and a menu wich is a tribute to French gastronomy.

First, a segment of the road between Stanstead and Richmond, this street originally took shape between 1802 and 1805. In 1811, it was named King’s Highway and in 1842, it became Wellington Street, in honour of the British general who had defeated the armies of Napoleon Bonaparte at Waterloo. Until 1855, Wellington Street North was not important commercially but the construction of the railway station on Depot Street that year turned Wellington Street North into Sherbrooke’s main commercial hub.

In the first decade of the twentieth century, Wellington Street South, which connects Sherbrooke to Lennoxville, is primarily residential. After the First World War, businesses such as garages, restaurants or hotels began to open. Today, Wellington Street South remains the location for many bars and restaurants.

In 1812, Charles Frederick Henry Goodhue opens the first general store in Sherbrooke. The store is located on present day Dufferin Street. The majority of the products sold come from Britain, but also from the Caribbean. Spices, liquor, hardware, tableware and other goods fill the shelves of the general store of Charles Goodhue.

In 1863, Hiram C. Wilson started his business in the Sherbrooke area. His shop specialized in musical instruments, such as pianos or organs. This music store became one of the largest in Canada and celebrated its 100th anniversary in 1963.

In 1849, the merchant William Brooks signs a 15 year lease with the British American Land Company (BALC) for a lot near the new dam #4, where he will build a paper mill. At the time, paper was still produced from rags and recycled materials. In 1852, a fire destroys the plant, but Brooks rebuilds and expands the mill.

The lumber industry gains in importance starting in 1837, following the construction of the large British American Land Company (BALC) sawmill. This sawmill was constructed at the entrance of the Magog River gorge, and handled logs floated from the Orford mountain area.

At the beginning of the 20th century, the third phase of industrialization sees the integration of Sherbrooke in the mainland economy. Facing a new competitive environment of emerging industries, particularly in the Mauricie and on the South Shore of the St. Lawrence, Sherbrooke ranks seventh among manufacturing towns of Quebec in 1927. This phase will also distance industry from the Magog River, resulting in the transformation of the hydrolic dams in hydroelectric dams between 1909 and 1916.

In this period of economic crisis and the Second World War, Sherbrooke enters in its fourth and final phase of industrialization. If the service sector grows, Sherbrooke remains dependent on its manufacturing sector during this period. It seeks to survive the economic crisis and to revitalize itself through the war industry. After the 60s, the service sector takes over.

King Street is major in Sherbrooke. It crosses the city from east to west, thus being one of the main roads of the municipality. It is also a major commercial artery. Before 1910, the developed portion of King Street lies between Montcalm and Wellington streets. When the automobile arrives in the early twentieth century, King Street becomes a busy business street along its entire length, host to several shops, hotels and other places of business in Sherbrooke.

It’s in the middle of the twentieth century that the supermarket changes the way to do groceries in Sherbrooke. In 1930, Sherbrooke has 85 grocery stores spread over her territory. It was around 1920 that the city witnessed the merger of some independents grocers, especially after the arrival of the A & P (Great Atlantic and Pacific Tea). This is a small revolution in the world of the grocery store! Going around the aisles with a basket to do the groceries is a major change. Before 1960, supermarkets set up shops in the city center. Later, these large supermarkets move to the mall. For example, a branch of the Dominion supermarkets open in Promenades King.

Following the American concept, malls make their way in Sherbrooke at the beginning of the Quiet Revolution. In six years (1960-1966), Sherbrooke has three new malls: Centre commercial Sherbrooke (now Promenades King), Centre commercial Belvédère and the Centre commercial de Rock-Forest. The arrival of these large centers modifies the commercial areas of Sherbrooke.

In 1909, Joseph Albert Robert opens his business J.A. Robert Fourrures et Manteaux Ltd. on Wellington Street North. In 1914, he sells clothing for men, before turning to women’s clothing in 1930. At the time, it’s one of the largest independent store in the Eastern Townships. Today, J.A. Robert Fourrures et Manteaux Ltd. is still owned by a descendant of Joseph Albert Robert. This is one of the oldest family businesses in Sherbrooke, passed on from father to son since its opening.

It’s in the turn of the twentieth century that the English-speaking majority in the business field declines in favor of French-Canadian entrepreneurs, but also Jews, Chinese, Syrians, and Armenians. While French Canadians are often at the head of associative family businesses, such as J.H Poupart et fils or J.M. Nault Limited, Jewish businessmen are most active in the field of textile. In 1920, Sherbrooke has four Chinese laundromats. Other businessmen from multiple origins open restaurants or other kinds of businesses.

Over 110 years of textile production Paton, corner King and Belvedere, end with the moving of the operations on Woodward Street. This closure turns a page of the industrial history of the city of Sherbrooke.

The Paton adapts and changes from hydraulic power with hydroelectricity. This change in energy source keeps its importance in the textile industry in Canada.

In a period of 8 months, explosions destroy the Richard Long manufacture, the Morril foundry and a sewing machine workshop.

The Charles Brooks feed and grain store

Apart from setting up its head office in Sherbrooke, the British American Land Company acquires properties and becomes an important actor in Sherbrooke’s land and industrial development.

In 1941, the Bishop of Sherbrooke, Bishop Philippe Desranleau, took steps towards acquiring Bishop’s College, which was facing a serious deficit. The Bishop was hoping to transform this institution into a francophone and catholic university but had to put its plans on hold due to the context.

Six years later, Bishop Desranleau tried again but despite his best efforts and an appeal to Dupessis, who was Prime Minister at the time, the project failed. Eventually, financial support from the provincial government allowed Bishop’s College to overcome its large deficit and effectively put an end the Mgr Desranleau’s project.

The city takes its place as one of the important urban centers of Quebec’s Catholic community on March 2nd 1951, when it is raised to the rank of archdiocese. On this date, Pope Pius XII confirms its new position by placing the dioceses of Saint-Hyacinthe and Nicolet under the authority of the new archbishop of Sherbrooke.

Bishop Philippe Desranleau became the first Archbishop May 10, 1951. He held this position until his death in 1952.

The Paton factory having reached its goals, Andrew Paton hoped to increase the production of tweed (wool fabric) and cashmere. He received support from the municipal authorities and built two new buildings. The following year, the company has over 450 employees. Several families surrounding areas will be attracted by city life offered by a salaried job. Paton increases the jobs often open to all. Many working families, often French-Canadian, will move on the board Marquette.

A committee was formed in Sherbrooke in 1953 to create a French and Catholic university. The committee received a civil charter from the Vatican on 6 February 1954. The following 24 February, the Legislative Assembly adopted a law transforming the Saint-Charles Seminary into a university.

The law came in effect on 4 May 1954. The University began to receive students in the fall of 1954 with 3 faculties. The Faculty of Arts was located in the Seminary, the Faculty of Law in the courthouse and the Faculty of Sciences at the École supérieure.

The construction of the present-day cathedral of Saint-Michel and its adjacent diocese began in 1915, under the supervision of Bishop Paul Larocque. Construction of the bishop’s residence progressed smoothely, however the building of the cathedral encountered several problems.

Between 1918 and 1954, the construction of the cathedral was interrupted due to economic conditions and lack of resources. The erection of the Gothic style building was completed in 1957.

The law that gave women the right to vote in Quebec was adopted by the National Assembly on April 25th 1940 under the government of Adélard Godbout. The women’s rights movement that had been central in pressuring the Godbout administration was led by Thérèse Casgrain. Quebec was the last Canadian province to pass such legislation. The 1944 Quebec General Elections were the first provincial elections which women had the right to vote.

This was the first strike to take place in Sherbrooke’s manufacturing sector in fifteen years. The workers demanded a wage increase since the eight cents an hour they received was lower than in any other Dominion Textile plant. Employees of the Pacific street plant were not unionized and were poorly organized. Nevertheless, while they returned to work after only three days, Sherbrooke’s mayor and chaplain were part of the negotiations to have wages raised to 12.5 cents an hour.

Women gained the right to vote at the federal level. The Canadian Parliament adopted a law giving all Canadian women aged 21 and up the right to take part in the election of Members of Parliament. Women who were members of the armed forces and soldiers’ family members had been able to vote in 1917.

Loyalist families like the Ruiters were originally from the Palatinate in Germany. In the early years of the 18th century, several thousand German Protestants had left the “Palatinate” area along the Rhine River and took refuge in England, to escape the poverty of their homeland, which had been ravaged by European wars, and because of alleged religious persecution. Many “Palatines” subsequently were sent by the British Government to Ireland and then to America, where most settled in the colony of New York. During the American Revolution, their descendants tended to support the Crown. Henry Ruiter, for example, served as a Loyalist officer, and subsequently became a Justice of the Peace in Quebec. John Ruiter became an officer for the administration of oaths and Jacob Ruiter established a sawmill near Cowansville.

The French Canadian begin to settle in Sherbrooke after the establishment of textile mills beginning in the 1850’s. The arrival of the railroad at the same time also stimulates population growth in Sherbrooke.

The British American Land Compagny stimulated settlement in the region. The colonisation company, established in Lennoxville and then in Sherbrooke, opened roads and facilitated the arrival of Scottish and Irish immigrants. Between 1835 and 1838, several hundred British subjects began a new life in the Eastern Townships.

The settlement of the French in the Eastern Townships was made possible by the establishment of the Association des Townships, by Father Bernard O’Reilley in 1848. Antoine Racine, bishop of Sherbrooke, will play an important role to promote the settlement of French Canadians. He founded the Sherbrooke Colonisation Society in 1881 and was its first president. He was also active in efforts designed to repatriate Franco-Americans living in New England.

During the 19th century, the increasing economy activities and the increasing number of countryside populations in the urban centers and the manufacturing towns only amplify the movement of anarchy and destabilizes the social and moral order. This was particularly the case for the city of Sherbrooke, which despite its small population, could not escape the disorder caused by the working classes, the unfortunate classes, the unemployed classes, the people who fight against the heads os state and the people who refuse to obey to the laws and the obligations. In addition, we are witnessing the illegal sale of alcohol along the construction sites, as well as fights and shoplifting. With the implementation of the prison Winter between 1865 and 1867, the penitentiary participated strongly into decreasing disorder, rehabilitation discipline and implementation of better laws in the city of Sherbrooke.

The Saint Colomban chapel is built in 1829. This place of worship is considered to be the first to be dedicated to Sherbrooke’s Catholic population.

Since 1852, the catholic parishes of the Eastern Townships depended upon one of three dioceses: Quebec, Trois-Rivères and Saint-Hyacinthe. Following an increase in the catholic population in the town of Sherbrooke and of its region, the bishop of Quebec proposes the creation of a new diocese. On 28 August 1874, pope Pius IX issued a papal bull to that effect.

In the early 19th century, parents have to pay for their children to attend school. The Sherbrooke Academy opens its doors to boys and girls of all faiths, but most of its students are Anglo-Protestants, reflecting the village’s population. The school was located on Church Street (now Bank) until a fire destroyed the building in 1856.

A year after offering its first classes in a commercial building, Bishop’s College moves into its new campus at the junction of the St. Francis and Massawippi rivers.

The campus is then composed of a single building, know today as McGreer Hall. The architecture of the original building and of adjacent structures is still striking due to its “Collegiate Gothic” style decorated with red brick and stone.

IN 1842, George Mountain, anglican bishop of Quebec, and the reverend Lucius Doolittle presented a private member’s bill to the Canadian legislative assembly to enable the creation of an anglican university in Lennoxville.

The bill was adopted by the Assembly on 9 December 1843. Bishop’s College was renamed Bishop’s University in 1958 and remains a central element of cultural life in Lennoxville and in the Townships.

The first school in Sherbrooke, an English school, is founded by the British North America Society. Children would learn reading, writing and grammar, a bit of latin, and arithmetic. The first teacher is the village blacksmith, William Walker. The school was situated on the present day location of the Petit théâtre de Sherbrooke (Dépôt Street).

The demographic and linguistic evolution of Sherbrooke is perceptible through the francization of some names. The most subtle example is Market Street, opened in 1835 by the British American Land Company (BALCO) to reach a new covered market building. In 1904, the street is renamed Marquette, maintaining similar pronunciation of the original English and celebrating Father Jacques Marquette, discoverer of the Upper Mississippi and French Canadian national hero. There will be other cases: Factory becomes Frontenac, Alexander becomes Alexandre, Academy takes the name de l’Académie, and Council is renamed Conseil­­.

The Sherbrooke Protestant Hospital opened its doors to young women wanting to become nurses. It was one of the first establishments in Quebec dedicated to medicine outside of Quebec City or Montreal.

A segment of Saint Catherine Road becames University Boulevard. The development of the University of Sherbrooke, then quite young (1954), illustrates the emergence of Sherbrooke as a city of learning and knowledge.

Vaccination becomes compulsory in Sherbrooke in 1911. Cases of disease that are virulent such as scarlet fever cannot be cured by medicine. To prevent the propagation and the spread of disease, we will use vaccine. We make it official that it is mandatory to be vaccinated (no 269).

Rémi Lamontagne is the third prisoner to be condemned to death at Winter prison. He would have killed his brother-in-law, Michel Napoléon, because of his incestuous love affair with his own sister, Léda Lamontagne. He will be condemned to death on December 19th 1890 and hanged on the same day.

The Sherbrooke University clinic opens its doors in 1969. The Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences of the University of Sherbrooke were already open since 1961.

This clinic will take the name of CHUS in 1974. (Centre hospitalier Universitaire de Sherbrooke)

Affiliation of Sherbrooke Hospital, Hospital Saint-Vincent-de-Paul and the Hotel-Dieu at the University of Sherbrooke.

Buildings and organizations are now considered as part of a single body.

This consolidation of different hospitals will allow better management, including funding.

In 1977, the creation of the CHUS Foundation will allow a cash inflow to all hospitals under the jurisdiction of the Centre Hospitalier de Sherbrooke. (Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke Hospital, the Saint-Vincent-de-Paul hospital and Hôtel-Dieu)

The CHUS Foundation aims to provide money to meet the financial needs of the hospital for equipment, research or maintenance of treatment efficacy.

The fourth hanging of Winter Prison is Antonio Poliquin’s. He violently murders his wife and then attempts to take his own life. His attempt is unsuccessful and he is summoned to the courthouse. His trial is held from the 20th to the 24th of November 1930, upon which, he is pronounced guilty of taking his wife’s life. He is condemned to death by hanging on the 20th of February 1930.

The United Nations declared 1975 as being the International Year of Women. Since then, March 8th has been celebrated as International Women’s Day. The Decade for Women was also established from 1976-1985.

In April 1966, during the meeting that saw the foundation of the WFQ, Therese Casgrain is named honorary president of the new organization, in recognition of her many years of dedication to the cause of women’s rights.

In 1998, «La Table de Concertation des groupes de Femmes en Estrie» becomes ConcertAction Femmes Estrie, an organisation whose main goal is to increase accessibility of women’s groups to various kinds of financing.

Formerly known as Services to help prisoners of Sherbrooke, the community organization emerged between the years 1958 and 1964. Since this date, it is in charge of the prisoners moral, physical and spiritual needs. In addition, their clothes are provided on behalf of the organization and the captives can be escorted into their home when they leave the Detention centre of Sherbrooke. It is only since 2006 that the organization changed its name to the Support services in crime prevention (SAPC).

This private hospital is founded by Dr. Jean-Emile Claus with his colleagues, Dr. J.O Camirand, J.A Darche, W. Lamy and J.A.C Éthier. They aquired the property and the building in 1910, but the hospital will not open its doors until 1917. This is one of the first secular french hospitals in Quebec. Noël hospital will change its name in 1922 when it joined administratively the Hotel-Dieu of Sherbrooke.

This research center contributes to the advancement of medicine, for providing better health care to Quebecers. Research is done to find new drugs or new test methods for the detection of diseases. The first director of the center is André Lussier. He remained in office for four years (1980-1984).

This disease causes almost 2000 victims and is overburdening hospitals in Sherbrooke. It affects the inhabitants of the city in three waves. At first, the cases are few, but the disease is spreading rapidly. The second and third wave cause more victims. This crisis ends in October 19, 1918, when no new cases of the Spanish Flu are diagnosed.

The Jewish community of Sherbrooke appeared in the 1800s, but disappeared around 1980. Coming from Ukraine, the first family to settle was that of Reuben Hart in 1863. Continuing its expansion, the Jewish community reached 265 inhabitants, out of 23,660 inhabitants. After two waves of migration, the community declined and celebrated its last religious service in 1983.

After the Second World War, a new wave of European immigrants arrives in the Eastern Townships. In the early fifties, a large number of French and Germans arrive in the region. From 1950 to 1960, Italian immigrants, Belgian, Polish, Austrian, Romanian and citizens of Eastern Europe come to Sherbrooke. The “Bien-être des Immingrants”, known today as the “Service d’aide aux Néo-Canadiens”, is founded in 1954.

Marie Malavoy is elected for the first time in Sherbrooke in 1994. She is the first woman elected in that riding, and the second woman elected to the National Assembly in the town of Sherbrooke.

Given the lack of resources to assist women living in situations of domestic violence in Sherbrooke, Laurette Giguère de Montigny is inspired by the creation of the first shelter in Longueuil, and takes it as an example to create L’Escale. On July 8 1977, the shelter is incorporated, becoming L’Escale de l’Estrie Inc.

The first official celebration of a Catholic mass takes place on 1 May 1816. The mass is celebrated before William Bowman Felton’s family, his wife being a Catholic. The officiating priest is Jean Raimbault, parish priest of Nicolet. In 1825, Felton, himself a Protestant, donates land to build a Catholic chapel.

During the autumn of 1930, Albert Vincent assassinates his old employer Edmond Trudeau. Albert Vincent wants revenge against this man because he was wounded during the summer of 1930 while working on his farm. He is condemned to death by hanging and is hanged on May 15th 1931.

Accused of the murder of an American, Reney Malloy, Pierre Albert St-Pierre is condemned to death by hanging on April 20th 1932. He is hanged on May 6th 1932, and it is the sixth hanging of Winter prison.

On Septembre 26th 1912, Samuel Madeleine is found guilty of stealing a horse while in Waterville. His body is discovered hanged in front of his cell shortly after is arrival at the Winter prison on the 26th of February 1913. His death is ruled a suicide, the jury maintaining that the man had succumbed to his own despondency.

In 1925, Alphonse Bluteau commits an incestuous act and is condemned to 2 years in prison. On the day of his arrival at Winter Prison, he is told that he will be transferred to Laval prison the next day. Moïse Robert, the jailor, finds Alphonse Bluteau hanged in his cell during his morning patrol.

Founded in 1835, the Sherbrooke Congregational Church enters its new temple (present day Plymouth-Trinity Church) in 1855. Renamed Plymouth Congregational Church in 1865, the congregation joined the United Church of Canada in 1925 and became the Plymouth United Church. It merged with Trinity United Church in 1971.

This rocky islet enters the lore of the Abenaki after a legendary race (dated about 1692) between an Abenaki chief and an Iroquois chief. This race until exhaustion around the rock was won by the Abenaki chief. The name Mena’sen, or rocky island originates from the words menahan (island) and sen (rock). The lone pine tree, mentionned in the archives since 1815, would become a famous landmark for pioneers. Despite the pine tree’s demise in 1913, Mena’sen, the Lone Pine Rock, is commemorated in the vicinity through place names.

The British Alexander Tilloch Galt moved to Sherbrooke in 1835 after his father, John Galt, founder of the British American Land Company, appointed him as bookkeeper in the office of the new company.

He began his political career in April 1849 when he was elected to the Assembly of the Province of Canada, while continuing his brilliant career as a business man. He was elected by acclamation, under the liberal-conservative banner, on 20 September 1867 during the first election of the Dominion of Canada in the Town of Sherbrooke district.

One of the Fathers of Confederation, Alexander Galt took part in the discussions and negotiations with London that led to the enactment of the Act of British North America March 29, 1867 and its official entry on July 1st the same year.

The Armoury of Sherbrooke was built in 1908 to accommodate the 53 th </ sup> Regiment, a regiment of English speakers. However, when the 54 th </ sup> Regiment, the Carabiniers de Sherbrooke, was founded in 1910, the armory hosts both regiments. Because of friction between the two units, the Canadian English regiment moves in 1912.

The Central Frontenac was built on a rock in the Magog River, through an investment by the Sherbrooke Gas & Water, which had the monopoly on electricity distribution in Sherbrooke (beating out the Royal Electric Company). Initially powered by a paddle wheel, the dam number 3 will be modernised over the years, following technical innovations. This hydroelectric dam remains the oldest generating station in operation in Quebec. It is located under the Hubert-Charron Cabana bridge, erected in 1870.

The political sciences student Pierre-Luc Dusseault, 19 years and 11 months of age, was elected during the 41st general election on May 2, 2011. Dusseault defeats the bloquist Serge Cardin and becomes the youngest member of the Canadian parliament in history.

This new hospital was opened under the direction of the Sisters of Charity offered various services of bacteriology in dental surgery. Between 1913 and 1917, they treated approximately 45 to 75 patients per day. In 1927, the population of the city increased and the hospital was expanded to offer 300 beds.

In 1910, Dr. Joseph-Ferdinand Rioux obtains the creation of his regiment, the 54 th </ sup>, after many years of word. This urban French Canadian regiment was composed of eight companies instead of the original request of four.
It was originally based at the Sherbrooke National Monument.

Once elected mayor, Bernard Sevigny initiated the creation of a board of directors with the aim of ensuring proper management of Hydro-Sherbrooke to make it more responsive to the needs taxpayers and to the city council.

Joseph Gibb Robertson was born in Scotland. It is the age of 12 that the young Robertson emigrated with his family in Quebec. He was elected as member of the Legislative Assembly during Quebec’s first provincial general election in August of 1867. During his political career, he worked for the development of railways in Quebec.

He will be defeated by twelve votes in the election of 1892.

The Sherbrooke Protestant Hospital was created by members of the Anglo-Protestant. Richard Heneker, his wife Elizabeth Tuson, and others obtained land in 1887 but due to the lack of funds, the construction project remained in stand-by until 1893. The project was then resurected through fundraisers and donations, making it possible to open the hospital in 1895. In 1920, the institution became the Sherbrooke Hospital.

This regiment shares the Sherbrooke Armoury with the Sherbrooke Fusiliers.

Constructed according to the plans of the architect Charles Frederick Preston Rubidge on Winter Street in 1867, the prison is one of the oldest buildings in Sherbrooke. The west side of the building follows Winter Street, formerly called Jail Street.

In 1892 Jérôme-Adolphe Chicoyne became, for the second time, mayor of Sherbrooke. Despite his new office, he also ran as a Conservative Party candidate in the elections of Wolfe county in 1892 where he was elected.
On the municipal level of politics Chicoyne attempted to modernize the city of Sherbrooke by building sidewalks in stone and efficient sewer system to prevent the spread of contagious diseases. In addition, he adopted solutions to prevent the exodus of businesses and industries that were planning to move to developing cities such as Saint-Hyacinthe.

Loyalist families like the Ruiters were originally from the Palatinate in Germany. In the early years of the 18th century, several thousand German Protestants had left the “Palatinate” area along the Rhine River and took refuge in England, to escape the poverty of their homeland, which had been ravaged by European wars, and because of alleged religious persecution. Many “Palatines” subsequently were sent by the British Government to Ireland and then to America, where most settled in the colony of New York. During the American Revolution, their descendants tended to support the Crown. Henry Ruiter, for example, served as a Loyalist officer, and subsequently became a Justice of the Peace in Quebec. John Ruiter became an officer for the administration of oaths and Jacob Ruiter established a sawmill near Cowansville.

William Gray’s hanging occurred on December 10th, 1880 at Winter Prison. This journeyman, an intermittent worker, had been convicted of Thomas Mulligan’s murder.

After a political career as local counselor from 1917 to 1926, Albert Carlos Skinner was elected mayor of Sherbrooke in 1930 by acclamation. His mandate coincided with the hard times of the Great Depression. Plants operated partially and construction was at a standstill. The City had limited resources to address this issue. It still put forward some measures including the creation of a public works program. In March 1931, the mayor signed an agreement with Canadian Pacific to build the viaduct Galt, near Laurier.

Ludger Forest first tried his luck in provincial politics, but this experience was very short. He became mayor of Sherbrooke in the worst of the economic crisis. The city tried to help by various means of direct relief. The year 1933 was marked by austerity. Some construction projects took form in Sherbrooke, mainly to provide work. While he was mayor, the City of Sherbrooke the Union of Municipalities of Quebec. Trying to break the alternating system between anglophone and francophone mayors, Ludger Forest sought a second term but was defeated in March 1934.

Dentist in Sherbrooke from 1894 to 1944, he enlisted in the Canadian Army during the First World War. He joined the City Council in 1926 and became the promoter of projects such as the development of the Champ de Mars and Park Dufresne. He retired from this position in 1933, but returned as mayor at the request of his constituents during a difficult economic environment. The City engaged in public works to hire the unemployed.

Born in Sherbrooke March 6, 1877, Émile Rioux studied at the Seminary Saint Charles Borromée de Sherbrooke before heading to the Faculty of Law of the Université Laval. He was admitted to the Bar on July 6 1900. Soon after his admission, he was appointed Crown Attorney for the District of St. Francis. Rioux enrolled more than 1,000 men in various regiments at the beginning of the First World War. His term as mayor was marked by the “centenary” of the founding of Sherbrooke. On this occasion, bridges, waterfalls, towers and public building are illuminated to bring some tourism during this period to end the economic crisis. The “centenary” celebration of 1937 were a major achievement for mayor Rioux.

M.T. Armitage was a municipal councillor from April 1931 to March 1938. Initiated at a young age in the business world, he was director of the National Council of milk, in addition to being co-founder and president of the Sherbrooke Pure Milk. Noticed in his work as counselor, he was proclaimed mayor without opposition in March 1938. His term as mayor was marked by a important rise in constructions. Two new churches were built, Sainte-Jeanne d’Arc and Holy Sacrament. Other measures were also taken to improve parks and to build a baseball stadium. His mandate saw urban expansion and modernization of the city and its infrastructure.

Born May 1, 1885, Joseph Labrecque studied in Saint-Gervais and at the Laval Normal School. His election stirred controversy, since as an assessor of the City of Sherbrooke, he would become both an employee and employer. He resigned from his position as assessor to devote himself to the town hall. During his tenure, the economy finally wiped away the remains of the economic crisis of 1929, World War II requiring a full economic effort. Several industries were inaugurated in Sherbrooke creating 572 jobs.

Born in Sherbrooke on September 18, 1877, Alexander Clark Ross studied at Sherbrooke Central School. Elected as municipal counselor four times, AC Ross became mayor of Sherbrooke without opposition in 1942 during the Second World War. The shortage of raw materials makes many industries unable to maintain their expansion. The construction sector also slowed considerably. The city annexed the town of Collinsville immediately adding 1450 people to the City of Sherbrooke. The city also acquired several properties, anticipating future industrial development.

J.W. Genest was a municipal councillor from 1935 to 1944 and presided certain commissions. He became mayor by acclamation during a significant rise in construction. The term occurs in a rationing of materials while the war still raged in Europe. To counter inflation and instability, municipal workers organised and the City subsequently signed several collective agreements.

Born in East Angus on April 2, 1893, James Bryant Guy Dixon continued his studies at the East- Sherbrooke School and then at Ontario Business College in Belleville. He was a municipal counselor from 1938 to 1946. He was elected despite his predecessor’s attempt to break the principle through which the mayor’s seat was held in rotation by francophones and anglophones. Under Bryant’s mandate, construction continued and the city also saw the arrival of new industries. In the area of public works, the city continued its policy of improving parks. It is also during the term of Bryant that the City of Sherbrooke decreed three days of civic holidays, on the feast of St. John the Baptist, Boxing Day as well New Year’s Day.

Born in Coaticook on December 28, 1900, Alphonse Trudeau studied at the Collège des Frères du Sacré-Coeur and Séminaire Saint-Charles-Borromée de Sherbrooke. He is also enrolled in the reserve army during the Second World War. Councillor from 1942 to 1948, he became mayor on 16 March 1948. The town expanded significantly reaching a new record in the construction industry in 1948-49. In addition, the City focused on public works required by urban development.

Born in Stanstead County September 27, 1885, Charles Benjamin Howard studied at Sherbrooke High School, Westleyan College in Stanstead and Bugbee Business College in addition to French studies at the Seminary Saint Charles Borromée. Known for his management skills, he sat as director of the Sherbrooke Trust, the Tribune of Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke Pure Co. and of the Sherbrooke Hospital. He was elected to the House of Commons from 1925 to 1940 as a Liberal and was then name Senator. His fame helped him win the mayoral election against Armand Nadeau. He expanded the city by annexing parts of the townships of Orford and Ascot. He obatined an amendment to the city charter to extend the mandates of mayors from two to three years. During his mandate the Joffre Bridge was inaugurated and a luminous cross was erected on Mount Bellevue.

J. Émile Lévesque was elected mayor of Sherbrooke in a three-way battle with a majority of 492 votes. His mandate saw the reconstruction of the ballpark which had been destroyed by fire in September of 1951. The year 1952 marked the start of construction of the Jacques-Cartier Bridge on the Magog River. On October 6 1952, the Council decided to establish a library in the building of the Central School. It is also under the mandate of Lévesque that is adopted the coat of arms of the city.

Andrew Paton personally managed his factory in Sherbrooke until his death. At the time, the Paton was the largest wollen manufacture in Canada. Andrew Paton was also active in municipal politics, serving two terms as a city councilor (1876-1880 and 1889-1891).

Following the restoration of the Canadian Sherman tank by the Montreal garnison’s 202nd service depot, “The Bomb” is placed in front of the armory on William street in Sherbrooke. This tank was in use from the landing in Normandy to the day of the Ally victory in Europe May 8th, 1945. It is the only Canadian Sherman tank to have not only participated in the famous landing but also to have survived until the end of the war. This monument has a significant value for the Sherbrooke Hussars.

Formerly, the tank was displayed in the Champ-de-Mars of Sherbrooke, in the Jacques-Cartier district.

Pantaleon Pelletier was born in the Kamouraska region. Born in a farming family, he studied at the Université Laval. He set up his practice as a surgeon in Sherbrooke. Elected as the Liberal member of the Legislative Assembly for Sherbrooke in 1900, he will become Speaker of the Legislative Assembly. He was reelected until he left his seat to become Quebec’s general agent in London on August 7, 1911.

Jean Charest was born in Sherbrooke where he complete all of his studies, including a law degree from the University of Sherbrooke. After a career in federal politics, Jean Charest was elected as Liberal member of the National Assembly for Sherbrooke in 1998 and headed the official opposition. He won the 2003 elections and became Premier. He was reelected twice and he lost power and his seat on 19 September 2012.

Sister Superior Dupuis and three other Sisters of the Charity of Saint-Hyacinthe moved into the building that would become the Hospice of the Sacred Heart. Hospice care was provided to the sick, but the sisters also helped the elderly and orphans.

The acquisition of a plot of 5 acres near Lennoxville by the Abbot Dufresne would lay the foundations for the establishment of this important hospice. Abbot Dufresne also donated $ 3,000 to the project development. This considerable sum to which would be added another $ 1,000 donation by Alexander Galt allowed the installation of this crucial center that would help the poor and the sick in the years to come.

The Winter prison is surrounded by a stone wall that was built in 1869. The right wing will be added to the building in 1871. The prison had 51 double and single cells and 12 sectors, including one that was reserved for isolation. In addition, the Winter prison had a parlor, a chapel, an infirmary, a kitchen, a laundry room and six other cells in the basement. There was also a checkpoint and a section reserved for women and workers.

Given the large number of people in need, Sherbooke’s Hospice had to take serious measures to increase its capacity. The construction of a railway station close to the hospice added to the factors pressing for the institution relocation. The Hospice of the Sacred Heart was rebuilt on a hill near Belvedere Road.

From 1867 to 1980, the prison was not overcrowded and the prisoners were grouped into different sectors according to their age, crime and personality. However, around the 1980s, the Winter prison was deemed unhealthy, too small for the amount of prisonners and inadequate for rehabilitation due to the facility’s obsolescence.

During the 19th century, the increasing economy activities and the increasing number of countryside populations in the urban centers and the manufacturing towns only amplify the movement of anarchy and destabilizes the social and moral order. This was particularly the case for the city of Sherbrooke, which despite its small population, could not escape the disorder caused by the working classes, the unfortunate classes, the unemployed classes, the people who fight against the heads os state and the people who refuse to obey to the laws and the obligations. In addition, we are witnessing the illegal sale of alcohol along the construction sites, as well as fights and shoplifting. With the implementation of the prison Winter between 1865 and 1867, the penitentiary participated strongly into decreasing disorder, rehabilitation discipline and implementation of better laws in the city of Sherbrooke.

On September 26th 1912, Samuel Madeleine was sentenced for stealing a horse in Waterville. After his arrival at the Winter prison on February 26th 1913, his body was found hanging outside his cell.

Following a referendum initiated by the councilors Daniel McManamy and Donat-Oscar Edward Denault, the town of Sherbrooke buys property rights of Sherbrooke Power, Light and Heat Co. The citizens and local businesses will benefit from a public service providing power, which is now managed by the municipality itself, rather than coporate monopoly. This was the fourth referendum, earlier attempts took place in March 1904, August 1904 and June 1907.

Municipal corporations lawyer by profession, O’Bready Moses was elected Conservative deputy for the riding of Sherbrooke on February 5th 1923, with a majority of 298 votes.
Due to health problems, he will never assist in the Parliament of Quebec and will be officially a deputy until December 22nd 1923, the day O’Bready dies.

Armand-Charles Crépeau was born in Saint-Camille, in the Eastern Townships. he will complete his studies at the Université Laval, and will practice as an engineer in the area of Sherbrooke. It was during the election in November 1924 that he was elected for the riding of Sherbrooke. Despite its strong social commitment, he will be defeated in 1931.

On April 10th, 1894, newspapers inform the population that some areas of the city are infected with scarlet fever.

The creation of the judicial district of Saint Francis, with Sherbrooke as its seat, brings judges, lawyers, sherifs, and other employees of the judicial system, as well as their families. They transform the Old North neighbourhood into a bourgeois district.

Son of a politician and Superior Court judge, George Frederick Bowen studied law in Quebec City. He opened a law office in Sherbrooke in 1835 and was named sherif of the district of St. Francis in 1844. On 10 July 1852, the newly elected municipal counsellors (the town was incorporated earlier that year) chose Bowen as the first mayor of Sherbrooke. Shortly after, he greeted the governor general, Lord Elgin, and a delegation of the Grand Trunk Railway when the rail line was inaugurated. Bowen also took part in defining the first municipal bylaws and setting up public services.

Of Scottish origin, Joseph Gibb Robertson studied in Vermont and in Sherbrooke. He was elected mayor for the first time in 1854. Landwoner and merchant, he ran a general store and was one of the first promoters of the Eastern Townships Bank, which began operations in 1859. He was also president of the Total Abstinence Society and provincial member of the legislative assembly from 1867 to 1892.

William Wallace Blanchard murders his best friend, Charles Andrew Calkins, during a night of particularly heavy drinking. He is condemned to death on October 14th, 1890. During his stay in the Winter prison, he will turn to religion even though he was never a man of faith.

Rémi Lamontagne is the third prisoner to be condemned to death at Winter prison. He would have killed his brother-in-law, Michel Napoléon, because of his incestuous love affair with his own sister, Léda Lamontagne. He will be condemned to death on December 19th 1890 and hanged on the same day.

The Sherbrooke University clinic opens its doors in 1969. The Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences of the University of Sherbrooke were already open since 1961.

This clinic will take the name of CHUS in 1974. (Centre hospitalier Universitaire de Sherbrooke)

Affiliation of Sherbrooke Hospital, Hospital Saint-Vincent-de-Paul and the Hotel-Dieu at the University of Sherbrooke.

Buildings and organizations are now considered as part of a single body.

This consolidation of different hospitals will allow better management, including funding.

In 1990, the Detention centre on Talbot Street, also known as the Talbot prison, replace the Winter prison in Sherbrooke. The prison become the Detention centre of Sherbrooke.

In 1977, the creation of the CHUS Foundation will allow a cash inflow to all hospitals under the jurisdiction of the Centre Hospitalier de Sherbrooke. (Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke Hospital, the Saint-Vincent-de-Paul hospital and Hôtel-Dieu)

The CHUS Foundation aims to provide money to meet the financial needs of the hospital for equipment, research or maintenance of treatment efficacy.

John Samuel Bourque has been involved with the Canadian Army. He was elected to the National Liberal Action in Sherbrooke in 1935, and was a minister for the National Union party, with Maurice Duplessis. Moreover, he was the party whip. He was finally defeated in 1960, and died in Sherbrooke, on March 5, 1974, at the age of 79 years.

Inside the old Winter prison, there are very small cells, double or single, with old metal beds, some dry paint with graffitis on the wall, some old radiators, toilets, sinks, showers and some bars in the windows. Despite the many efforts employed to keep the building intact, the structure continues to deteriorate itself.

Serge Cardin completed his studies at the university of Sherbrooke in 1974, then became councillor for the city of Sherbrooke from 1986 until 1998, and federal deputy of the Sherbrooke district from 1998 until 2011 for the Bloc québécois.
Elected september 4th 2012, he is a deputy for the Parti Québecois and assumes the role of Vice-President of the Commission of Public Administration since November 7, 2012.

“The Sherbrooke Hussars” regiment was the result of a merger that took place on February 15th 1965, between the Sherbrooke Regiment and the 7 / XI Hussars. Its origins can be traced back to 1866 when the Fenians threatened to invade Canada by Stanstead and Island Pond. In response to this aggression, the Sherbrooke Infantry Battalion was created on September 21st 1866. It was composed of six companies whose headquarters were situated in Melbourne (approx. 40km to the North of Sherbrooke). From this moment, the regiment bore several names until 1965, at which point it became “The Sherbrooke Hussars”.

King George VI and Queen Elisabeth stopped in Sherbrooke for one hour. This was the first Canadian visit of a reigning monarch. Sherbrooke’s military regiments ensured that the royal couple’s security during their brief presence in the town.

The fourth hanging of Winter Prison is Antonio Poliquin’s. He violently murders his wife and then attempts to take his own life. His attempt is unsuccessful and he is summoned to the courthouse. His trial is held from the 20th to the 24th of November 1930, upon which, he is pronounced guilty of taking his wife’s life. He is condemned to death by hanging on the 20th of February 1930.

Joseph Sylvénie Tétreault is a local counselor from 1915 to 1928 before becoming mayor with no opposition in April 1928. Under his mandate, the civic Hospital is renovated and the new Aylmer Bridge is constructed. On 4 November 1929, the Police Commission orders the purchase of chips to indicate the names of the streets in Sherbrooke.

Emery-Hector Fortier was born in Lennoxville. In regard to his professional activities, he began as a clerk in his father’s business in Sherbrooke. Then become director and owner of several small businesses in the Eastern Townships.

In the political sphere, he began as an alderman, and from January 1922 until November 1934. It was during this period that Emery-Hector Fortier was elected to the Legislative Assembly, on 24 August 1931. However, Emery-Hector Fortier in November 1935 he was defeated by a certain John Samuel Bourque.

James Keith Edwards is born in Huntingdon in 1871. He is a local counsellor from 1914 to 1926 and again from 1929 to 1832 before being elected mayor for the period of 1926 to 1928. November 7 1926 marks the unveiling of the monument erected on King Street in memory of local soldiers who died during the First World War. The year 1927 saw the implementation of development projects of the dam and plant Westbury.

William Brault is a local counsellor from 1905 to 1908 and again from 1912 to 1922 before being elected as mayor without opposition in January 1923. His mandate ends on a positive note: without any augmentation of the real estate tax, the city stills has an overflow in revenues in 1925 which makes the debt go down. During his retirement, Brault’s is accused of theft. However, he is acquitted in june 1926.

William Morris enters local politics in 1893. He is the mayor of Ascot canton from 1893 to 1901 and prefect of Sherbrooke’s county from 1897 to 1901. He is elected mayor without opposition on January 9 1922. Under his mandate the city’s council approves the reconstruction of the Dufferin bridge.

Raynald Fréchette was born in Asbestos, he was elected in Sherbrooke on June 5th, 1966, under the banner of National Union. He was defeated April 29, 1970, but will return to the National Assembly under the banner of the Parti Quebecois April 13, 1981. He will be named Minister of Revenue by Rene Levesque.

Born at Lac-Mégantic, Jean-Paul Pepin specializes in administration, during his studies. This led him to be involved with major companies such as Molson and New York Life Insurance.

It is at the age of 31 years Jean-Paul Pepin is interested in politics. Thus, between 1959 and 1960 he chaired the Young Liberal Association of Sherbrooke.

He will be the Liberal candidate in the 1970 elections. He won those elections by 5,603 votes. Finally, he will be defeated November 15, 1976 by the PQ candidate, Gérard Gosselin

On March 26 1940, Maurice Gingues becomes the first francophone to represent Sherbrooke’s district at the House of Commons. He’s elected with more than 40% of the vote in the 20th general election. He still holds the record for the longest mandate for the district, with 6224 days (17 years, 15 days).

Lawyer and a Conservative, Brooks was elected three times by acclamation in three consecutive general elections held on October 12 1878, January 22nd 1874 and September 17th 1878. He was the second member of the Parliament for Sherbrooke.

Lawyer Robert Newton Hall, for his second mandate, had to face his first oppponent, M. Louis-Charles Bélanger. Hall wins the election by 577 votes, for a total of 68,20% of the votes. Of a conservative allegiance, he was elected for the first time by acclamation on June 20 1882. During the 22 first years of the Confederation, deputies of Sherbrooke were all elected by acclamation (Galt, Brooks and Hall himself).

The fourth MP for the riding of Sherbrooke, conservative William Bullock Ives, businessman and lawyer from Compton, died July 7, 1899, while he was still in office. He was elected to the House of Commons for Sherbrooke on March 5, 1891 with 58,20% of the votes, then by acclamation during a by-election December 21, 1892. He was also a town councilor from 1875 to 1878, and mayor of Sherbrooke from January 1878 to January 1879. He is also the only MP from Sherbrooke to have represented another county at the Canadian Parliament during his life. In fact, he represented Richmond-Wolfe (Quebec) for thirteen years in Ottawa, from 1878 to 1891.

Social Credit and lawyer Gerard Chapdelaine defeats Progressive Conservative Maurice Allard by nearly 8000 votes in Sherbrooke June 18, 1962. He is then 26 years 11 months old, which makes him the youngest member from Sherbrooke to be elected at the time. Chapdelaine gets one of the 26 Social Credit seats in Quebec and one of the 30 in Canada.

Academic and liberal New Brunswicker Joseph Patrick Irénée Pelletier won the election by more than 23 000 votes than his closest opponent, Yves Dubois from NPD, winning 71,79% of the poll. He has began his political career in 1972, beating creditist Maurice Couture by less than 10% of the total votes.

Another noticeable fact about Pelletier: he is the only MP for Shebrooke, with the exception of Galt, born outside of Quebec.

Progressive Conservative and lawyer Jean J. Charest beats the liberal veteran Irénée Pelletier during de 33rd general election of Canada with more than 50% of the total suffrage September 4, 1984.

Charest was then 26 years of age, making him the second youngest in Ottawa’s Parliament.

The native of Sherbrooke became leader of the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada April 29, 1995, but resigned April 3, 1998. He then continued his career in provincial politics.

Formerly known as Services to help prisoners of Sherbrooke, the community organization emerged between the years 1958 and 1964. Since this date, it is in charge of the prisoners moral, physical and spiritual needs. In addition, their clothes are provided on behalf of the organization and the captives can be escorted into their home when they leave the Detention centre of Sherbrooke. It is only since 2006 that the organization changed its name to the Support services in crime prevention (SAPC).

Having worked as a chaplain for several years in the Winter prison, Father Dandenault obtained the presidency of the organization in 1971. He will then lead a campaign in order to get a new prison because the Winter jail is too small and outdated. About 20 years later, in 1990, it is the official opening of a new prison on Talbot Street, which is named the Detention centre of Sherbrooke.

On December 23rd 2012, the Tribune published an article about somes issues concerning the rooms and cells at the Detention centre in Sherbrooke on Talbot Street. It was said that prisoners are angry due to the deterioration of living conditions inside the prison. They denounce that the heating does not work well, that the gym is less accessible than before, that there are delays in the visits and that there is a delay within the health services. These numerous difficulties are due to the problem of under-funding and the lack of staff in the prison.

Conservative farmer and businessman John McIntosh gets his two mandates by winning with only a few dozen votes each time.

He’s elected for the first time during a by-election January 25, 1900 after his predecessor William Bullock Ives died July 15, 1899. He beat the liberal George Albert Le Baron by only 96 votes. For his re-election, July 11, 1900, McIntosh gets a 31 votes advantage on his opponent Le Baron. He thus wins by less than 1% of the suffrage, 1693 votes against 1662.

McIntosh also had a career in provincial politics from 1886 to 1894. He’s also the second and the last before 2013, to die in office July 12, 1904.

In 1914, the Sherbrooke courthouse is purchased by military authorities, namely the “53rd Sherbrooke Regiment”, in order to transform it into a military armory. Today, the William’s armory is still home to the Sherbrooke Hussars.

The Battle Honors, or battles in which participated Sherbrooke Hussars, are registered on the regimental Guidon. Through time and a number of battles, the Sherbrooke Hussars as well as previous units (under other names) put down their Guidons in the Church of St-Peter of Sherbrooke, on Dufferin street. This regimental tradition goes back to April 1919, when Sir Georges Perley went there to put down his own regimental colors (Camp flags).

This church was chosen not only for its proximity to the William armory but also because it was Anglican, a denomination to which a majority of the soldiers of that time adhered. To this day, soldiers go to this church to lay down their Colors and Guidons.

Lt. Colonel Luc Tremblay, transfers command of the unit of armored reconnaissance reservists to Lt. Colonel Daniel Lamoureux. Nearly 140 guests are present, including General Paul G. Addy (retired) honorary colonel of the Regiment, Colonel Stéphane Tardif, Commander of the 35th Canadian Brigade group, as well as several former servicemen of the Sherbrooke Hussars.

German prisoners of war were held in Sherbrooke during World War II as well as in Quebec, Farnham, Sorel and Trois-Rivières. The prison was situated on grounds which were formerly the property of Quebec Central, a railroad company. It was called “Camp Newington” and was the 42nd of its kind in Canada.

In 1995, the four hospitals in acute care of Sherbrooke (the Centre hospitalier de Sherbrooke, the Hôtel-Dieu de Sherbrooke, the Hôpital Saint-Vincent-de-Paul de Sherbrooke and the Sherbrooke Hospital – acute care section only -) are merged to form the Centre universitaire de santé de l’Estrie. In 2000, this group became the Centre hospitalier de l’Université de Sherbrooke (CHUS).

Marie Malavoy is elected for the first time in Sherbrooke in 1994. She is the first woman elected in that riding, and the second woman elected to the National Assembly in the town of Sherbrooke.

Ms. Françoise Dunn was elected as first female city councilor of Sherbrooke in 1982. She represented the Northern District for two terms, from 1982 to 1990. She passed away in January 2013 after losing her battle to leukemia.

The “Monument to the Brave”, also called “cenotaph”, is a monument in memory of the Sherbrooke soldiers who participated in World War I. The monument depicts an angel with its wings spread and a crown of laurels in its hand, representing victory, flying over three Canadian soldiers in the trenches. The four bronze statues were made in Belgium while the base was sculpted out of granite from Stanstead.

The library is named in honor of Éva Senécal, poet, novelist and journalist from the Eastern Townships. Born in La Patrie in 1905, she will work on and off for La Tribune, a Sherbrooke newspaper. The Sherbrooke Historical Society granted her this homage in 1990 after she passed away in Sherbrooke two years before, in honor of her career in literature.

The district of Lennoxville also has its own monument named “The monument of Heroes”. It was erected in honor of the Canadian soldiers who died fighting the Great Wars of the 20th century. It is situated near the former City hall and was set up by the citizens of Lennoxville and Ascot “as a silent and permanent testimonial to the men from the Town and surrounding district who gave up their lives for the benefit of mankind”.

The Sherbrooke Historical Society has celebrated the opening of an exhibition on the history of Hydro-Sherbrooke, which explains the operation of its hydroelectric production, since the creation of the first dam, through its municipalization until today. Thus, this interactive tour makes accessible to the visitor the turbine hall and various observation points on the dam of the oldest still operating in central Quebec.

Terminus St. Francis was built on the edge of the river according to the plans of the Shawinigan Water and Power, at a cost of 825,000 dollars. It allows interconnection of Hydro-Sherbrooke with this private company, whose contribution is essential to ensure sufficient power to meet the energy demand of the city. Commissioning will provide nearly two-thirds (26 000 KVA in 1960) of the subscriber demand the grid.

Formerly known as the Department of Gas and Electricity, the mayor of Sherbrooke Armand Nadeau suggests that the electricity distribution service is renamed Hydro-cité-Sherbrooke to emphasize the aspect the company is owned by the city. However, this designation will change immediately to be simplified under the name Hydro-Sherbrooke, which is closer to the reference name of Hydro-Québec.

During the autumn of 1930, Albert Vincent assassinates his old employer Edmond Trudeau. Albert Vincent wants revenge against this man because he was wounded during the summer of 1930 while working on his farm. He is condemned to death by hanging and is hanged on May 15th 1931.

Accused of the murder of an American, Reney Malloy, Pierre Albert St-Pierre is condemned to death by hanging on April 20th 1932. He is hanged on May 6th 1932, and it is the sixth hanging of Winter prison.

On Septembre 26th 1912, Samuel Madeleine is found guilty of stealing a horse while in Waterville. His body is discovered hanged in front of his cell shortly after is arrival at the Winter prison on the 26th of February 1913. His death is ruled a suicide, the jury maintaining that the man had succumbed to his own despondency.

In 1925, Alphonse Bluteau commits an incestuous act and is condemned to 2 years in prison. On the day of his arrival at Winter Prison, he is told that he will be transferred to Laval prison the next day. Moïse Robert, the jailor, finds Alphonse Bluteau hanged in his cell during his morning patrol.

There are multiple policies regarding death penalty. Throughout its history, however, Winter Prison has always used hanging as its only method of execution, no other methods were used.

De nombreuses politiques existent sur la peine de mort. Toutefois, tout au long de son histoire, la prison Winter a seulement utilisé la pendaison comme exécutrice de la peine capitale toutes autres méthodes ne furent jamais utilisés.

Winter Prison used the death penalty primarily during the first half of the 20th century. However, the death penalty was only abolished on July 16th 1976 by the Government of Canada.

Hydro-Sherbrooke plans to invest $ 34.7 million until 2020, to maintain and upgrade the electrical and mechanical structures of the 8 plants. These investments ensure the future of power generation in the city of Sherbrooke, which represents 5% of its total energy production which is 1000 MWh, because most of the volume is purchased from Hydro-Québec. This will be done in accordance with the Act on Dam Safety, adopted in 2002 by the Government of Quebec.

The Bloc Québécois and accountant Serge Cardin is elected for the time September 14, 1998 in a by-election following the resignation of Jean Charest.

Cardin’s election marks the beginning of a Bloc Québécois predominant period in Sherbrooke. Indeed, Cardin obtains no less than five consecutive mandates. He almost always gets more than half of the vote in each of them, approaching 60% in 2004.

He’s defeated by the young NDP Pierre-Luc Dusseault on May 2, 2011.

Gilbert Hyatt, a Loyalist from Vermont, receives Ascot township for himself and 204 associates in 1792. He settles in the township by 1794, but he only receives confirmation of his land grant in 1801. The following year, he builds a mill at the entrance of the Magog River and establishes a village that he names Hyatt’s Mill. The village will be renamed Sherbrooke in 1818 and forms the beginnings of the current city.

In winter of 1948, an ice jam formed in Sherbrooke’s and caused a great flood. The damage, however, was much more severe in Bromptonville and was worsened once the ice jam disloged itself and slammed downstream into that village. Seventeen homes were destroyed in the ice and water.

Constructed according to the plans of the architect Charles Frederick Preston Rubidge on Winter Street in 1867, the prison is one of the oldest buildings in Sherbrooke. The west side of the building follows Winter Street, formerly called Jail Street.

Loyalist families like the Ruiters were originally from the Palatinate in Germany. In the early years of the 18th century, several thousand German Protestants had left the “Palatinate” area along the Rhine River and took refuge in England, to escape the poverty of their homeland, which had been ravaged by European wars, and because of alleged religious persecution. Many “Palatines” subsequently were sent by the British Government to Ireland and then to America, where most settled in the colony of New York. During the American Revolution, their descendants tended to support the Crown. Henry Ruiter, for example, served as a Loyalist officer, and subsequently became a Justice of the Peace in Quebec. John Ruiter became an officer for the administration of oaths and Jacob Ruiter established a sawmill near Cowansville.

The Canadian Foundation for the Protection of the Heritage aims to preserve the material heritage of the industrial period. It joined a project to recycle the remaining buildings of the Paton industries. Still present in the Sherbrooke landscape, the old red brick buildings with old windows frames gives an historical flavour to the newly renovated buildings.

The Winter prison is surrounded by a stone wall that was built in 1869. The right wing will be added to the building in 1871. The prison had 51 double and single cells and 12 sectors, including one that was reserved for isolation. In addition, the Winter prison had a parlor, a chapel, an infirmary, a kitchen, a laundry room and six other cells in the basement. There was also a checkpoint and a section reserved for women and workers.

During the 19th century, the increasing economy activities and the increasing number of countryside populations in the urban centers and the manufacturing towns only amplify the movement of anarchy and destabilizes the social and moral order. This was particularly the case for the city of Sherbrooke, which despite its small population, could not escape the disorder caused by the working classes, the unfortunate classes, the unemployed classes, the people who fight against the heads os state and the people who refuse to obey to the laws and the obligations. In addition, we are witnessing the illegal sale of alcohol along the construction sites, as well as fights and shoplifting. With the implementation of the prison Winter between 1865 and 1867, the penitentiary participated strongly into decreasing disorder, rehabilitation discipline and implementation of better laws in the city of Sherbrooke.

The owners of Orford township (Jonathan Ball) ând of Ascot township (Gilbert Hyatt), establish a partnership to build a dam at the mouth of the Magog River. Their mills, which use the hydraulic power from the dam, will be the focal point for the new hamlet which will become Sherbrooke.

In 1792, a group of Loyalists led by Gilbert Hyatt are granted Ascot township. They will have to wait until 1801 to obtain confirmation of this grant.

Having transfered its headquarters in Sherbrooke in 1835, the British American Land Company (BALC) acquired all the available land south of the Magog River and intended to develop this neighbourhood. The economic crisis that followed limited settlement, but starting in the 1840’s, several manufactures were set up nearby and workers began to occupy the neighbourhood.

In 1898, the British American Land Company (BALC) sells its vacant properties near the original southern district (opened in 1855) due to high property taxes. The lots are mostly sold to businessmen who open Gillespie, Alexandre, Aberdeen and Laurier streets. The neighbourhood will be inhabited by working class French Canadians, living in vernacular style houses (working class houses with clapboard). This was in contrast with the first streets of the district, opened in 1855, which were occupied by Anglophones living in larger houses.

During the 1850’s and 1860’s, many factories opened, namely in the textile industry. Many of the newly arrived workers could not find housing in the Old North or Marquette districts. A new neighbourhood, know as Liverpool, was developed above the Montcalm bridge, on either side of Liverpool Street (present day King Stree West). This working class neighbourhood originally included Magog and King West streets and Queen Boulevard South. New streets were added in the 1900’s and 1910’s : Richmond, Esplanade, Victoria, London and Queen Boulevard North.

The original southern district was created in 1855. The first segments of Brooks and Gordon streets, as well as Ball, Alexandre, Sanborn and Wellington South were lined with victorian and later Queen Ann style houses. This original part of the neighbourhood was inhabited by merchants and businessmen.

Centre de ressources pour l’étude des CANTONS-DE-L’EST

In 1818, the Gazette of Quebec announces that the hamlet known locally as Hyatt’s Mill shall be henceforth named Sherbrooke, thus honouring His Excellency the Right Honourable Lt-Gen Sir John Coape Sherbrooke (Arnold, Nottinghamshire, 1764 – Calverton, idem, 1830), Governor General of British North America. His mandate as Governor General was short (1816-1818) but he obtained by his policy of conciliation the confidence of Bishop Plessis and Louis-Joseph Papineau. His declining health forced him to resign prematurely.

The neighborhood of Dubreuil, located within the current borough of Fleurimont, was established by Gabriel Dubreuil in early 1960 around the aerodrome. Du Baron Street (1964) recalls one of Mr. Dubreuil’s aircraft, a Beechcraft Baron. Other nearby roadways refer to aeronautical companies (de l’Aeronca, du Cessna, Dornier) or specific aircraft (du Concorde, Debonair, du Comanche, d’Apollo).

Opened between 1988 and 1993, this street’s name is typical of the alphabetic odonymy practiced in the borough of Rock Forest: each name for a given sector begins with the same letter, as decided by the city council of the former Rock Forest municipality. For example, the neighborhood centered on Mi-Vallon Boulevard (opened from the sixties on) is the domain of ‘M’ names, such as Mondor (Henri, French writer), Maréchal (local family), de Montmartre (Parisian hill), du Mûrier (mulberry tree), Monet (Claude, French painter), de la Mirabelle (fruit from Lorraine) ou Marcel-Marcotte (local music teacher). This sector is right next to the ‘P’ sector. Other sectors nearby include ‘C’, ‘V’, ‘G’, ‘H’, ‘F’ and ‘B’.

The streets at the crossroads at the heart of Sherbrooke receive new designations celebrating the British homeland, signifying that the Sherbrooke community belongs to the Empire.
-Named around 1836-37, King Street pays homage to His Majesty William IV (1765-1837) who reigned from 1830 to 1837.
-Named in 1842, Wellington Street honours Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington (1769-1852), a general who defeated Napoleon and later became Prime Minister.

This commemorative plaque installed on Great Forks Bridge, recalls the native Abenaki toponymy of this place. An important meeting place for First Nation peoples, the junction of Alsiganteka (Saint-Francis) and Potegourka (Magog) rivers is known as Ktineketolek8ak (a present-day Abenaki would say Nikitotegwac), which is translated by “Grand Forks”.

The demographic and linguistic evolution of Sherbrooke is perceptible through the francization of some names. The most subtle example is Market Street, opened in 1835 by the British American Land Company (BALCO) to reach a new covered market building. In 1904, the street is renamed Marquette, maintaining similar pronunciation of the original English and celebrating Father Jacques Marquette, discoverer of the Upper Mississippi and French Canadian national hero. There will be other cases: Factory becomes Frontenac, Alexander becomes Alexandre, Academy takes the name de l’Académie, and Council is renamed Conseil­­.

The tracing of Ball and Brooks streets is made in 1855; they end at the same spot until 1870, where is currently found Racine Park (as seen on the picture). Those names commemorate two pillars of the early community, mayor Albert P. Ball (1822-1893) and MLA Samuel Brooks (1793-1849). The great number of English-language citizens, Loyalists or immigrants, among the founders and builders of the city is responsible for the strongly English character of Sherbrooke toponymy. The persistence of this nomenclature despite large demographic changes constitutes an important element of the city’s heritage.

The later arrival of the francophone community in Sherbrooke led to a difference in the toponyms’s: it was only in 1930 that Goodhue, then Brickyard, then Saint-Gabriel Street received the name of the Camirand family, one of the first French- Canadian families to settle and thrive in the city.

A segment of Saint Catherine Road becames University Boulevard. The development of the University of Sherbrooke, then quite young (1954), illustrates the emergence of Sherbrooke as a city of learning and knowledge.

The creation of the judicial district of Saint Francis, with Sherbrooke as its seat, brings judges, lawyers, sherifs, and other employees of the judicial system, as well as their families. They transform the Old North neighbourhood into a bourgeois district.

The Commission de Toponymie du Quebec enshrined the name of Mount Bellevue in 1970, which was used much earlier. The mountain has known multiple toponymic variations on the theme of gorgeous landscape: Belvidere, Beauvoir, Fairmount, Prospect, Mount Pleasant…

Inside the old Winter prison, there are very small cells, double or single, with old metal beds, some dry paint with graffitis on the wall, some old radiators, toilets, sinks, showers and some bars in the windows. Despite the many efforts employed to keep the building intact, the structure continues to deteriorate itself.

In 1914, the Sherbrooke courthouse is purchased by military authorities, namely the “53rd Sherbrooke Regiment”, in order to transform it into a military armory. Today, the William’s armory is still home to the Sherbrooke Hussars.

In the first decade of the twentieth century, Wellington Street South, which connects Sherbrooke to Lennoxville, is primarily residential. After the First World War, businesses such as garages, restaurants or hotels began to open. Today, Wellington Street South remains the location for many bars and restaurants.

The “Monument to the Brave”, also called “cenotaph”, is a monument in memory of the Sherbrooke soldiers who participated in World War I. The monument depicts an angel with its wings spread and a crown of laurels in its hand, representing victory, flying over three Canadian soldiers in the trenches. The four bronze statues were made in Belgium while the base was sculpted out of granite from Stanstead.

Following the American concept, malls make their way in Sherbrooke at the beginning of the Quiet Revolution. In six years (1960-1966), Sherbrooke has three new malls: Centre commercial Sherbrooke (now Promenades King), Centre commercial Belvédère and the Centre commercial de Rock-Forest. The arrival of these large centers modifies the commercial areas of Sherbrooke.

To ensure a better coordination in development projects and to maintain its position in relation to competiting cities, Sherbrooke merges with its neighbouring municipalities on 1 January 2002. Eight municipal entities form the new Sherbrooke : Ascot, Bromptonville, Deauville, Fleurimont, Lennoxville, Rock Forest, St-Élie-d’Orford, and the former town of Sherbrooke. With approximately 140,000 inhabitants, the new municipality, covering 366 km2, ranks seventh amongst the most important cities in Quebec.

This rocky islet enters the lore of the Abenaki after a legendary race (dated about 1692) between an Abenaki chief and an Iroquois chief. This race until exhaustion around the rock was won by the Abenaki chief. The name Mena’sen, or rocky island originates from the words menahan (island) and sen (rock). The lone pine tree, mentionned in the archives since 1815, would become a famous landmark for pioneers. Despite the pine tree’s demise in 1913, Mena’sen, the Lone Pine Rock, is commemorated in the vicinity through place names.

After the municipal merger of 2002, the problem of having streets with similar or identical names was brought up. The toponymic merger process was quite slow, and only on March 21, 2005, did the city council pass the resolution for the new odonyms. In some cases, the family names were adjusted by adding the first name (in Brompton, Laurier becomes Wilfrid-Laurier), others changed completely: du Parc (Fleurimont) becomes du Cégep, High (Lennoxville) becomes Charles-Lennox, Summer (Vieux-Sherbrooke) becomes Winter…

After more than a month of street signs being installed, the toponymic changes caused by the 2002 municipal merger process enter official use, effective for 50000 citizens. A specific case is the disappearance of Summer street in Old-Sherbrooke, a short stretch of road joining William street to Winter street. Thus, there was once upon a time when Summer and Winter met at a crossroads, a peculiar piece of poetry for streets bordered respectively by the Sherbrooke Hussars Armoury and Winter Jail. Following this decision, both segments are designated by the name Winter Street.

Hubert-Charon Cabana and Louis-Charles Bélanger founded the first French newspaper of Shebrooke, Le Pionnier. The editorial line advocated the union between the two language groups in the region, Anglophones and Francophones. The motto of the newspaper, «La Patrie avant tout», demonstrated the importance of the national question and the colonization of the region in the eyes of its founders.

«Le Pionnier» remained active for 35 years until 1902.

The foundation of the Tribune by lawyer Jacob Nicol marked the birth of a new publication in Sherbrooke’s French media landscape. The Tribune was the result of a desire to create a publication that could represent Liberal interests in the area. Governemnt representatives from Brome, Richmond and Wolfe participated in funding its creation.

In the first edition, one sentence leaves no doubt about the ideological orientations of the Tribune: “The Tribune is first and foremost a Catholic newspaper. Because we are the obedient servants of our Church, we, as managers, will never allow its columns to be used to spread seditious content. “

In 1954, senator Jacob Nicol, who already headed a communication group formed of La Tribune, CHLT-AM and CKTS, obtains a license for the first television station in Sherbrooke. In 1955, Me Paul Desruisseaux and M. Jean-Louis Gauthier take control of the project and begin work to erect a transmitter at the summit of mount Orford. The antenna is completed in the winter of 1956 and the studios are installed at the corner of Frontenac and Dufferin Streets, in the same building as the other components of this media group.

The Sherbrooke Daily Record is an English newspaper founded by L.S. Channel through the merger of the Sherbrooke Examiner and of the Sherbrooke Gazette. From 1938 to 1968, the Record was owned by the Bassett family which maintained the newspaper’s original role as a regional newspaper. Over the years, the Record lost importance in the media spotlight due to the decline of the region’s English speaking population. However, the Record is still active today, despite the decline in circulation.

At its foundation, the club was called the Randies of Sherbrooke and it evolved in the predecessor of the QSHL, the QPHL. The Sherbrooke Saints will emerge with this name in 1949 and will win their only championship in 1950. The year 1954 will be the last for the team.

The name of Louis-Bilodeau was given to Highway 610 by the Commission de toponymie du Québec. Journalist and television host Louis Bilodeau (1924, Rouyn-Noranda – 2006, Sherbrooke) was part of the original broadcast team for Sherbrooke TV station CHLT-TV (later Télé-7) in 1956. Form 1960 to 1983, he hosted the widely followed show «La Soirée Canadienne», recorded in Sherbrooke and starring each week a different Quebec locality, its inhabitants, its folklore and its cultural universe. He participated in numerous other cultural events during his long career. A mural facing the Museum of Nature and Sciences on Frontenac Street celebrates his place in Sherbrooke culture.

In 1945, Radio-Canada had seven private affiliated radio stations located in Sainte-Anne-de-la-Pocatière, Sherbrooke, New Carlisle, Rimouski, Rivière-du-Loup, Rouyn, Quebec and Hull.

This commemorative plaque installed on Great Forks Bridge, recalls the native Abenaki toponymy of this place. An important meeting place for First Nation peoples, the junction of Alsiganteka (Saint-Francis) and Potegourka (Magog) rivers is known as Ktineketolek8ak (a present-day Abenaki would say Nikitotegwac), which is translated by “Grand Forks”.

In 2013, there are twenty of these theater groups that performed on the scenes of the Sherbrooke area, in addition to those related to the school system. Among the amateur theaters of Sherbrooke, there is the théâtre l’Intégrale, the Théâtre de l’Hybris, the Mille Feux (Université de Sherbrooke), the ligue d’impro l’Abordage, the Théâtre de l’Insomnie, the théâtre de l’Aparté, the troupe CRÉ-ation et the Zannis Artpailleurs.

On 19 September 1951, the baseball stadium on Park avenue is victim of a fire. The stadium dates from 1938 and it can contain 3600 spectators. It has a completely wooden structure. Fortunately, the flames do no casualties, fire occurring after the game presented that evening.

In 1996, Anne Hebert, renowned Quebec writer, donated the original copies of her works to Sherbrooke University. This donation includes manuscripts, typescripts, personal notes and audio documents representing the main part of her work written during her time in Quebec. This donation has made possible the creation of the Anne Hebert research center at the Université de Sherbrooke.

The library is named in honor of Éva Senécal, poet, novelist and journalist from the Eastern Townships. Born in La Patrie in 1905, she will work on and off for La Tribune, a Sherbrooke newspaper. The Sherbrooke Historical Society granted her this homage in 1990 after she passed away in Sherbrooke two years before, in honor of her career in literature.

The Sherbrooke Historical Society has celebrated the opening of an exhibition on the history of Hydro-Sherbrooke, which explains the operation of its hydroelectric production, since the creation of the first dam, through its municipalization until today. Thus, this interactive tour makes accessible to the visitor the turbine hall and various observation points on the dam of the oldest still operating in central Quebec.

The land, located today between Belvedere Street North and the Magog River, near King Street West and Montcalm bridge begins to develop circumstances for the establishment of the future plant Paton, a few years before its founding. In 1823, Charles F. H. Goodhue, a very active member of the new town (Sherbrooke), built a dam (instead of the current bridge Montcalm) and a water mill in 1828. We find the first buildings (called the Woollen Factory), as well as the technologies of the time for the textile industry. The first houses were built textile workers and some specialists in the field will move to Sherbrooke. In 1834, the land company called the British American Land Company (BALB) invests huge capital around Sherbrooke. BALC Goodhue bought the sector and seeks to make the investment in improving production and reorganizing hydraulic power for textile mills along the Magog River. To highlight the lands around the river Magog, BALC offered free energy and the ground for a large industrial project would boost the economy of Sherbrooke.

The Sherbrooke Jets, the Winnipeg Jets’ farm team, were part of the American Hockey League from 1982 to 1984.

The Montreal Canadien farm team, the Sherbrooke Canadiens, plays in the American Hockey League from 1984 to 1990. The team won the Calder trophy in 1985.

The history of the Sherbrooke Gazette is complex, given that it changed names on a few occasions, including The St. Francis Courrier and Shebrooke Gazette and the Farmer’s Advocate and Townships Gazette. This publication was the oldest newspaper in the Eastern Townships. It merged with the Shebrooke Daily Record in 1908.

To stimulate tourism and economic development in a time of crisis, the town organised celebrations for Sherbrooke’s centenary although the hamlet was established in 1802 and the town incorporated in 1852,